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 Has anyone ordered a Pizza recently? Or ordered anything in fact, online, for home delivery?

We open our device, a phone, tablet or computer, find what we want and order it. And at that point, the information flow back to us begins;

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First off, the confirmation – “Thank you, we’ve got your order.”

And advice to manage your expectations – “We’re just preparing your order; Your order should be with you between 7:20pm – 8:15pm; We will notify you once your order is ready for delivery.”

And then the progress updates. And often there’s an App to track the progress:

“Your order has been made and has just left with our courier; Your order is approximately 10 minutes away; Your order was successfully delivered.”

 

 

Keep staff connected when core systems are inaccesible
The feedback loop

We have come to expect this type of continuous cycle of feedback. It manages our expectations and preempts us, as the requester of the service, from contacting the provider for updates. We know what’s happening as it’s in the palm of our hands. Apps, messaging services and tracking tools are our go-to for in-the-moment communications.

We have come to expect this type of continuous cycle of feedback. It manages our expectations and preempts us, as the requester of the service, from contacting the provider for updates. We know what’s happening as it’s in the palm of our hands. Apps, messaging services and tracking tools are our go-to for in-the-moment communications.

With all this modern technology that exists to provide reassurance and with our expectations raised around constant communication and feedback, why would we send an email in a situation that requires an instant response?

The clever use of these technologies leaves us satisfied, but it raises our expectations that this should be the norm in all walks of life. If we can track something as unimportant as our pizza, we start to question why we can’t do the same thing with more important communications?

We can all think of situations where our requests ‘disappear into the ether’; when we don’t know if our request has been received, or when we might get a response or how long it’s going to take to fulfil it.

And yet that is what school staff are expected to do. Email from a classroom to the office (sometimes automating the email via an MIS system’s emergency alert tool). Hope that it’s been received. Hope that someone in the office has passed the message on to an SLT member or first aid responder. Hope that the help will arrive in a timely manner. But hope is not a strategy!

 

 

Continue to manage safeguarding and emergency incidents
Simplifying help requests in schools

The situations where a staff member is requesting help, by their nature, tend to require a high level of immediacy in the response. Perhaps a student is being disruptive and needs to be removed from a class in order to allow others to continue or a first aider is required. Perhaps there is a need to evacuate or an intruder on site. Maybe it’s just that some guidance is needed that would make the difference.

These are exactly the situations where two-way communication and a continuous cycle of feedback come into their own.

  1. Knowing that a request for help has been received and actioned
  2. Being able to track what will happen next and add more information as a situation evolves
  3. Managing expectations around when help will arrive and that it’s on its way

Apart from the obvious benefit to staff from the reassurance such a system brings, the ability to respond to requests more quickly and appropriately brings huge benefits; quicker responses, sending the right person with the right skillset, saving time, cutting out duplication and tracking responses.

Having these systems in place brings huge benefits to the provider of the service too. Processes are defined and consistently followed. Everyone gets guidance on the best way to deliver the service, there is a record of what happened to each order and plenty of data to analyse, including in cases where things went wrong and lessons need to be learned.

teamSOS gathers and preserves evidence of steps taken
Time to try out modern in-school incident management

If you’d like to explore a modern approach to school incident management that meets the expectations of the workforce of today, with self-service tracking, messaging and automated processes that will bring benefits to the smooth running of your school, please get in touch with teamSOS…

About teamSOS

teamSOS is an on-call incident and emergency response app for schools and trusts.  teamSOS is off-premise, ensuring your school or Trust can still communicate and manage any type of incident during your recover from a cyber attack by providing:

  • A simple cyber incident reporting app for every member of staff
  • Secure closed-response announcements to keep all staff updated and gather information quickly as a situation develops
  • A comprehensive incident log, gathering and preserving evidence
  • In-the-moment guidance, with customisable task lists to support your critical incident and cyber incident response plans
  • Safe, secure messaging for use on personal devices aids business continuity when key systems or equipment are unavailable
  • Drill mode to ensure preparedness and staff awareness helping refine your processes
  • Incident ‘type’ tracking across your organisation and evidences your response
  • Integration with leading safeguarding platforms to ensure you remain KCSIE compliant during a critical incident

teamSOS works across computers, mobiles, tablets and even clickable personal panic buttons that can attach to a lanyard.

Arrange a chat with our team

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